MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij

MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
Finally the day has come to show you my first upcycle design attempt. A few months ago I started to collect discarded plastic milk containers, 2-litre ones. I set myself a goal to make a lampshade out of these milk containers. Easier said than done of course. But after some trial and error I found a way to ensemble the scales I had cut out.

Turning plastic into a flower lampshade

Those scales/shells where the base for the lampshade. The connected scales form a ring and three ringes form the lampshade. Some wires attache the lamp bulb socket and cord. The name of this design came from the beautiful light that is thrown against the ceiling and looks like a flower.
MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
Making this upcycle lampshade was great fun and very exiting to do. Because I had a feeling of what it should be without knowing exactly how it would turn out. The best part is that during the trial and error part I started to get new ideas of what I could do with these plastic milk containers.
Well I can only say, stay tuned, more upcycle design is on the way. Please let me know what you think, good or bad! Take a look at ‘See more photos’ for, you guessed it, more photos.
MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
MilkFlowery lampshade by Gilbert de Rooij – upcycleDZINE
Photos © Gilbert de Rooij

Design by Gilbert de Rooij | upcycleDZINE
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5 COMMENTS

  1. Gilbert, great work! Love the organic quality you achieve working with these “petals,” and the softness of the light coming through them!

    And I love how clearly you have the eye and the mind of the designer, as demonstrated by two things (in addition to your design skill!): you see, and refer to, the pieces of the milk carton as “scales” or “shells” – and it is this ability to see the components an item is made of that lets you see new possibilities for “composing” with it.

    And second, you valued the result of the trial and error, instead of viewing it as wasted time, because it gave you new ideas. 🙂

    Thanks for sharing your work . . .

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